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A Preparedness Metaphor – Building An Image of Preparedness Planning

By Denis Korn

How are you building your preparedness planning structure? Will it be strong and endure - or weak and collapse when you need it most?

Last year when this post first appeared I realized from many conversations with new preparedness planners that the development process was haphazard and unfamiliar.  Creating a strong, reliable and proper preparedness structure with its many facets, provisions and scenarios is comparable to building a fortress.

Your preparedness program is your sanctuary during times of disaster, uncertainty, turmoil and instability – A place of security and strength.

It is time once again to revisit an illustration or metaphor that can be useful in conceptualizing and picturing the preparedness process as if you were an accomplished architect.

I have always liked metaphors and imagery in making a point or in conveying a message.  So for those of you who also like illustrations, allusions and visualizations, here is my architectural metaphor for the emergency or disaster preparedness planning process.

I believe it presents what I would call a holistic approach or picture to the many aspects and requirements to a complete and effective preparedness plan.  In January 2010, I wrote a short post where I named 4 pillars of preparedness planning:  Attitude, Knowledge, Planning and Action.  This article expands on those themes.

The foundation of this architectural rendering is Faith and Action

Any structure or plan must have a strong, secure, reliable and appropriate foundation on which to be built upon.  If you don’t have the faith necessary to believe the plans you are creating are strong, secure, reliable and appropriate, then your structure will be weak and inadequate.  Action of course is what insures that your plan will be realized and complete.  Faith and action must work together – faith without action is infertile and fruitless – action without faith can be directionless and hollow.

The cornerstone is Honesty

You must be honest with yourself, family and friends about why you are preparing – what must be done – are your actions sufficient and focused – are you driven by fear and confusion or clear thinking and discernment – are you being conscientious – are you taking all aspects of planning into account – your provisions and research are they inadequate and just token.  I wrote a post on Honesty here, you are encouraged to read it.

The 3 pillars are:

Spiritual Worldview

Everyone has a spiritual worldview.  We are all grounded in a point of view about spiritual, religious or transcendent issues.  You either believe there is a spiritual influence in your life or you don’t.  Either way that belief will affect how you prepare, why you prepare, when you prepare, who you prepare for and what motivates you to prepare.  Our spiritual worldview has a direct correlation to our actions, thoughts and intentions.

Attitude

Your attitude, emotional state, feelings, thoughts, state of mind, viewpoint and morale have – in my opinion -  an essential baring on how your entire planning process – and you – will hold up during a significant emergency or disaster scenario.  I wrote a post on Attitude here, you are encouraged to read it.

Practical Accomplishment

Here is where your actions are realized and achieved.  You plan appropriately and do what is required to fulfill your goals.  Research, knowledge, planning and implementation – get it done!  I wrote 3 foundational articles on Preparedness Planning here, here, and here – you are highly encouraged to read them.

The capstone of your magnificent structure is Peace of Mind

Celebrate peace of mind, security, self-reliance and a job well done!

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